Tim Fisher
Defining oneself as a woodworker these days often leads to more questions than answers.  It would be much easier to specify: furniture maker, cabinetmaker, carpenter, artist, craftsman.  Yet I try not to confine myself to one label.  “Woodworker” suits me just fine, and all ambiguity that goes with it.  Folks always ask me what kind of work I do.  After years of fumbling a response, I’ve realized my work is creating spaces for people.  That may be a simple shelf on a wall or renovating an entire room.  I’ve built places to cook, places to bathe or to sleep.  I can build a table to share a meal or a shed for garden tools.  In today’s busy world, a charming space can make all the difference in life.  A rocker by the stove, a window seat, an office desk — wood adds a warmth absent in so many other materials.  And so it’s the medium I’ve chosen to focus my time.

     I find a pleasant balance in working with wood.  It engages the mind and hands equally.  It’s always a stimulating process, beginning with rough boards that often still reflect the form of a tree.   A design moves back and forth from paper to plank through the act of machining, hand shaping and finishing, bringing the whole piece to life.  

     I like woodwork to be solid and elegant, not too adorned but with gentle details.  Proportion is important.  Lines interplay with weight.  I try to keep my work diverse and fresh.  A light touch and thoughtful approach go farther than following the latest trend.  Each project is different; a blend of ideas between craftsman and client.  A design may be driven by a budget Heron Benchor by the batch of wood at hand.  Perhaps the setting of a home begs for a certain tone.  It should be a creative process for all parties involved.  While I’m most content designing my own work directly with clients, I’m happy to work with other designers, builders or architects.  Larger projects with a unified aesthetic can be a rewarding collaboration.
Contact Tim:  (207) 546-6658
​tim@wateringcovestudios.com